“The Great Spruce” and Cider!

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“The Great Spruce” Author John Duvall

Sunday we were lucky enough to have author John Duvall sell his children’s book “The Great Spruce”. This story is about a tree that means a lot to a young boy named Alec. When men from the Big City discover it, they ask if they can cut it down to display in the city square for the holidays. Alec’s parents are honored, but Alec does not want to lose his favorite tree.  He offers a compromise and everyone wins in this joyful, informative tale, which appears to take place in a small town along the Hudson. See a one-minute video trailer for the book here: http://www.thegreatspruce.com/copy-of-the-book.

All proceeds from book sales were donated to Irvington Farmers Market for the Food Donation program, which takes donated food from vendors once a month and provides it to facilities for a children’s cooking class. More books will be on sale at the community tent this week, so don’t forgot to pick up a copy!

We also provided some warm apple cider to enjoy while reading!

 

Warm Apple Cider Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 3 cinnamon sticks
  • 1 tsp. nutmeg
  • 5-10 cloves
  • Orange and lemon peels
  • 1 container Wright Farm apple cider

Instructions:

  1. Pour 1 container of Wright Farm apple cider in a pot and warm.
  2. Add in cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, orange and lemon peels.
  3. Let warm for 15 minutes.
  4. Keep uncovered last 5 to release scent. Enjoy!

This week at the Market

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Daylight Saving Time ends tomorrow. Enjoy that extra hour of sleep and remember that market still opens at 9-even if your body feels like it’s 10. Fun fact about DST: Coldplay’s Chris Martin is the great-great-grandson of William Willett, who popularized the notion of daylight savings in 1907.

Berry Brook Farm has brussels sprouts on the stalk which provides a wonderful task for idle hands during dinner preparation. Snapping the sprouts is awfully therapeutic and a perfect activity for an early dinner guest. For tips on choosing, storing, and cooking brussels sprouts, take a look at this newly minted guide by Alison Roman for the The New York Times

If you’re starting to meal plan for Thanksgiving, check out this brussels sprouts and chestnuts in a brown butter sauce recipe. It’s a strong contender for best side.  Stay in Turkey day planning mode and bring your knives for sharpening. You don’t want to ruin the big reveal by spending hours hacking away at your bird with a dull knife. Make sure to also stock up on olive oil from Kontoulis. This will be their last visit of the season- they’re off to Greece on Tuesday for olive harvesting.

It’s not too late to order you free-range, hormone and antibiotic-free bird from Southtown. You can also put in your pie orders with the Pie Lady & Son: go for the classic pumpkin or pecan or you can spice it up with an apple, pear, and walnut crumble. You should also stop by La Petite Occasion for some artisanal and unique sweets like caramel apples and cider caramels.

Tomorrow we’re getting a late-in-the-season addition to the prepared foods line-up. Anthi’s Greek Food is bringing their well regarded fare to the Rivertowns. People particularly rave about their spanakopita, moussaka, and baklava. Try it for yourself.

We have Irvington author John Duvall reading from his new children’s book The Great Spruce, so bring the kids.

See you at the market!

Vendor List (subject to change)
Anthi’s Greek Food
Berry Brook Farm
Bien Cuit
Big Bang Coffee Roasters
Blessed Brew
Deep Roots Farm NY
DOC Pickle
FarmEats
Joe Tomato Mozzarella
Kontoulis Family Olive Oil
La Petite Occasion
Let Them Eat Pita
Madura Farm
MOMO dressing
Nutty Spread
Pie Lady & Son
Pura Vida Fisheries
Ready Set Sharp Knife Sharpeners
Sohha Savory Yogurt
Southtown Farms
Sunset View Farm
Sun Sprout Farm
teagevity
Brent The Cheese Guy
True Food
Wave Hill Breads
What’s For Dessert?
Wild Sea Salt
Wrights Farm


Pumpkin Gnocci and Puree Recipes

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Happy Halloween! To celebrate we have some delicious and nutritious pumpkin recipes for you. Not only do pumpkins taste great, but they contain nearly 20% of your recommended intake for vitamin C and have more potassium than a banana! Pumpkin gnocci is sure to warm you up after a long night of trick or treating. And in case you’re planning on using your pumpkin from the market, check out how to make your own puree!

 

Pumpkin Gnocci

By our sponsors, Atria (Rye Brook)

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups pumpkin puree
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 c. whole-milk ricotta, drained
  • 1/2 c. grated pecorino cheese
  • 1 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg
  • 2 tsp. kosher salt, plus
  • 1 ½ c. flour

To make the pumpkin ricotta gnocchi dough:

  1. Mix the pumpkin puree, ricotta, parmesan, eggs and salt together in a large bowl. Add 2 cups of the flour and mix well with your hands. The dough should be very sticky, impossible to work.
  2. Add another half cup of flour and mix that in, you want the dough to still be pretty sticky, but pliable enough to shape into a large log.
  3. Keep adding a little flour at a time until you can get a soft dough that will be rollable. It should never require more than 4 cups of flour. Cover the dough with a damp towel.
  4. Bring a large pot of water to a boil, then add enough salt to it so that the water tastes salty. Let this simmer while you make the gnocchi.
  5. Roll out the dough and cut the gnocchi: To make the gnocchi, spread some flour on a large work surface and have more flour ready. Cut the dough log into four equal pieces.
  6. Take one piece and cut it in half. Roll the piece of dough into a snake about 1/2 inch thick, then cut it into pieces about the width of a fork.

 

Pumpkin Puree

Ingredients:

  • 1 (4-6 pound) baking pumpkin, rinsed and dried
  • Kosher salt
  1. Heat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Slice a small piece of skin off the one side of the pumpkin so when laid on its side, the pumpkin will lay flat without rolling. Remove the stem and split the pumpkin in half from top to bottom, using a large cleaver and a mallet.
  3. Scoop out the seeds and fiber with a large metal spoon or ice cream scoop. Cut the fibers with kitchen shears if necessary. Reserve seeds for another use.
  4. Sprinkle the flesh with kosher salt and lay the halves, flesh side down, on a parchment paper-lined half sheet pan. Roast until a paring knife can be easily inserted and removed from the pumpkin, 30 to 45 minutes. Test in several places to ensure doneness.
  5. Remove the half sheet pan to a cooling rack and cool the pumpkin for 1 hour.
  6. Using a large spoon, remove the roasted flesh of the pumpkin from the skin to the bowl of a food processor.
  7. Process until the flesh is smooth, 3 to 4 minutes. Store in the fridge for up to 1 week or freeze for up to 3 months.

 


Turkey Time!

14355022_1089508044420159_1465693114637275964_nNovember is right around the corner and it’s time to start thinking turkeys. Southtown Farms is taking orders this Sunday. Having visited Matt’s farm, we can confirm that Southtown really does practice sustainable agriculture and treats his animals with dignity and humanity. After serving four years in the Marine Corps, including a combat tour in Iraq, Matt developed a desire a to cultivate food with respect for all living things. His turkeys, chickens, and pigs are free to roam in their pastures and raised without antibiotics. That makes for a healthier, more sustainable, and tastier bird. Be sure to stop by his tent to reserve your turkey.

If you need any inspiration for yogurt breakfasts or cooking with za’atar, follow Sohha Savory Yogurt on instagram. They snapped a pic of their fall yogurt parfait using pumpkin, molasses, fall spices, and pecans. Yum! Try it at home.

Deep Roots Farm NY still has lots of fall greens including mustard greens, frost kiss kale, and bok choy. If you also need autumn greens inspiration, check out this Food52 recipe collection. Deep Roots just weeded and reseeded their greenhouses to continue growing throughout the winter. They are documenting their weekly progress on their Facebook page, so make sure to follow them.

The cooking demo team is taking a break this weekend but they’ll be back next Sunday.

See you at the market!

Vendor List (subject to change)
Berry Brook Farm
Bien Cuit
Big Bang Coffee Roasters
Blessed Brew
Deep Roots Farm NY
DOC Pickle
FarmEats
Joe Tomato Mozzarella
Madura Farm
Pie Lady & Son
Pura Vida Fisheries
Red Jacket Orchards
Sohha Savory Yogurt
Southtown Farms
Sunset View Farm
Sun Sprout Farm
teagevity
Brent The Cheese Guy
True Food
Wave Hill Breads
What’s For Dessert?
Wrights Farm


Apples, apples, and more apples!

wrightsDid you know this season’s apple harvest was significantly lower than in past years? There was an early April freeze that wiped out of the fruit production, but fortunately our orchards have had enough to keep up with our demand. Head to the market and pick up a bag or a bushel and try your hand at the apple crisp Jane made last week or this easy fried apple recipe from Wrights Farm

There are dozens of apple varieties with some better suited for snacking and others for baking. Check out the New York Apple Association page for a handy visual guide to the different kinds of apples grown in our state. While you’re there, navigate to their recipe page for gems like hot cider wassail, gala apple slaw, and apple country bread. For a quick weeknight dinner, try this apple, squash, and chicken skillet recipe from The Redheaded Baker.
You can get the chicken for the skillet dinner at Southtown Farms. While you’re there, put in your order for Thanksgiving turkey before they sell out.

Luxx Chocolat xquisite artisan chocolate will be at the market with Halloween inspired delicacies. They’ll have a special pumpkin votive full of skulls, kandy korn, and more- a spooky, edible party centerpiece.

AnnaMaria’s Northern Italian Jams is also back with freshly made jams, marinades, and tomato sauce- made with local and fresh ingredients.

Chef Daniel from Atria Rye Brook will be preparing pumpkin gnocchi with a sage butter sauce. Yum!

See you at the market!

Vendor List (subject to change)

AnnaMaria’s Northern Italian Jams

Arlotta Food Studio

Asian Farmer Dumpling

Azukar

Berry Brook Farm

Bien Cuit

Big Bang Coffee Roasters

Blessed Brew

Deep Roots Farm NY

Dobbs & Bishop Fine Cheese

DOC Pickle

The Cookery’s DoughNation

FarmEats

Found Herbal

Joe Tomato Mozzarella

Luxx Chocolat xquisite artisan chocolate

Madura Farm

Mariachi Mexico

MOMO dressing

Pie Lady & Son

Pura Vida Fisheries

Red Jacket Orchards

Sohha Savory Yogurt

Southtown Farms

Sun Sprout Farm

teagevity

Brent The Cheese Guy

True Food

Wave Hill Breads

What’s For Dessert?

Wild Sea Salt

Wrights Farm
Find out more about the market at http://irvmkt.org/. Be sure to tell us #WhatsCooking on Facebook and Instagram. Join us!


Stovetop Apple Crisp Recipe

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Stovetop Apple Crisp

Ingredients:

  • 4-5 apples (Wright Farm)
  • 2 tbsp. maple syrup (FarmEats)
  • 5 tbsp. butter
  • 2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1 cup of finely chopped walnuts (or pecans)

Instructions:

  1. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a skillet.
  2. Add the apples, cinnamon and 1 tablespoon of maple syrup. Stir well until combined.
  3. Put the lid on and let the apples cook on medium to medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, until they are soft but still have their structure (about 7 minutes).
  4. In a small, non-stick pan add the walnuts and brown for a few minutes until lightly toasted.
  5. Serve apples in a bowl and sprinkle nuts on top.
  6. Top with ice cream or whipped cream (optional).
  7. Enjoy!

 

5 Health Benefits of Apples:

  1. Fight bad breath. The pectin in apples helps control food odors and promotes saliva, which cleanses the breath.
  2. Reduce the risk of stroke. Studies show that increased apple consumption was associated with a decreased risk of thrombotic stroke.
  3. Prevent constipation. Apples are high in fiber, which adds bulk to the stool.
  4. Combat fatigue. The high amount of vitamin C and antioxidants in apples reduce oxidative stress that is linked to fatigue.
  5. Reduce the risk of diabetes. Apples have phytonutrients that help regulate and prevent spikes in blood sugar.

 

By Jane Wynne


Pie!

14705604_1197283523676286_3015999419042237129_nSingle serving pie? Pie Lady & Son has them! Try their apple crumble, made with fruit from a local Rockland orchard. If you have never been to Pie Lady & Son’s shop in Nyack, it’s worth a trip, especially if you can’t wait a whole week for pie! Another vendor with their own storefront is What’s For Dessert? Cindy has realized a longtime dream and opened her own bakery/cafe in Tuckahoe. Nutmeg is a lovely space with great coffee, pastries, and bite-size desserts. Congratulations!

NY Chup is back fresh off their kitchen where they whipped up a new batch of ketchup. This condiment easily fits into fall dishes like beef stew, shepherd’s pie, and pot roasts. Pick up the new batch.

If you’re already starting to think turkey, head to Southtown Farms who will be taking turkey orders.

We are back cooking this weekend under the tent! Jane will be making a stovetop apple crisp using local apples and cider from Wrights Farm and maple syrup from FarmEats as a sugar alternative. She will also be discussing the many nutritional benefits that apples have including fiber, vitamin C and powerhouse of phytonutrients. Instead if making a typical heavy fall dessert, this dish will be a lighter version on the classic recipe. And all made using one stovetop pan!

Thank you to everyone who donated for the Dobbs Ferry Food Pantry. Despite the nasty weather, we were able to collect a good amount to send over.

There are still tickets left to the harvest dinner tomorrow. Please message for tickets.

See you at the market!

Vendor List (subject to change)
Asian Farmer Dumpling
Berry Brook Farm
Bien Cuit
Big Bang Coffee Roasters
Blessed Brew
Deep Roots Farm NY
Dobbs & Bishop Fine Cheese
DOC Pickle
The Cookery’s DoughNation
FarmEats
Joe Tomato Mozarella
Let Them Eat Pita
Madura Farm
NY Chup
Pie Lady & Son
Pura Vida Fisheries
Red Jacket Orchards
Sohha Savory Yogurt
Southtown Farms
Sun Sprout Farm
teagevity
Brent The Cheese Guy
True Food
Wave Hill Breads
What’s For Dessert?


It’s Squash Season!

img_0834The bright and fresh palate of summer gives way to the rich and bold flavors of autumn as we welcome October. Squashes are the stars of the season, a fact Sun Sprout Farm knows well. They grow six varieties that will all be at the market on Sunday.

Sometimes the choices of squash can be overwhelming and how to cook them can be puzzling. CUESA has created a handy guide to the most common varieties along with a stellar collection of recipes that push beyond a basic roast. You can also talk to Simon and the gang at Sun Sprout for background info and tips. They will be more than happy to help you pick out the perfect squash and share favorite recipes. 

Let Them Eat Pita will be at the market this Sunday. Ask them about their Middle Eastern “bagel”- pita with labneh, a sprinkle of Za’atar, and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, topped with Israeli chopped salad, pickles and pickled turnips. Falafel is optional. If you want to recreate it for a quick weekday breakfast/lunch wrap, head to Sohha Savory Yogurt for the labneh and the za’atar and Kontoulis Family Olive Oil for the oil. Top with pickled peppers from Deep Roots Farm NY!

The Knife Sharpener is visiting for his monthly gig…make sure to bring your dull blades. Music is by Fred Gillen Jr.-hopefully the rain will let up a little so we can enjoy it.

See you at the market!

P.S. It’s time for the annual Harvest Dinner event which raises money for the Irvington Farmer’s Market. The dinner is on Sunday October 16th from 6-9PM at the Eileen Fisher Leadership Institute, 50 South Buckhout,Irvington NY 10533. Please RSVP while tickets are still available. Event tickets are $75 per person and can be purchased here.

Vendor List (subject to change)
AnnaMaria’s Northern Italian Jams
Asian Farmer Dumpling
Berry Brook Farm
Bien Cuit
Big Bang Coffee Roasters
Blessed Brew
Deep Roots Farm NY
Dobbs & Bishop Fine Cheese
DOC Pickle
The Cookery’s DoughNation
FarmEats
Joe Tomato Mozzarella
Kontoulis Family Olive Oil
Let Them Eat Pita
Madura Farm
Nutty Spread
Penny Lick Ice Cream Company
Pie Lady & Son
Pura Vida Fisheries
Ready Set Sharp
Red Jacket Orchards
Sohha Savory Yogurt
Southtown Farms
Sun Sprout Farm
teagevity
Brent The Cheese Guy
True Food
Wave Hill Breads
What’s For Dessert?
Wild Sea Salt
Wrights Farm


Ground Cherries

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“What tastes like a cherry tomato injected with mango and pineapple juice, and looks like an orange pearl encased in a miniature paper lantern?”  The answer is a ground cherry! Some folks call them husk cherries, cape gooseberries, etc., but around these parts they are known as ground cherries. In the nightshade family and a close relative of the tomatillo, these tiny sweet berries grow in a papery husk that turns brown when ripe. They aren’t widely available but thankfully Berry Brook Farm will have them on Sunday. 

It’s doubtful you’ll leave many in the basket but if you can display some willpower, the Smithsonian Magazine has compiled five ways to eat them other then just popping them in your mouth. Trust us, these fruits are a must.

If you’re interested in growing ground cherries or any other plants, stop by the market tent to talk with visiting Master Gardener Amy Sherwood. Ask questions, get ideas and take home free, helpful resources provided by Cornell University Cooperative Extension including: How to Plant a Vegetable Garden, the Westchester Garden Planting Calendar, A List of Suggested Vegetable Varieties for Westchester, Starting Seeds Indoor, and more.

Looking for something to eat that doesn’t have a lead time of 75 days? Try the market pizza from the Dough Nation pizza truck. Last week they made a roasted apple and duck bacon pie that was divine. Wonder what they will come up with this week…

We’re also curious what Mariachi Mexico is cooking up…we saw some market tamales on their instagram and are crossing our fingers that they’re headed for Irvington. Luxx Chocolat is back with artisanal marshmallows and seasonal chocolates. Indulge yourself…

Found Herbal is also back and now would be a good time to stock up on elderberry syrup to combat the sickness that inevitability comes with cooler weather.

Matt Turk is our musical guest.

See you at the market!

Vendor List (subject to change)
Arlotta Food Studio
Asian Farmer Dumpling
Azukar
Berry Brook Farm
Bien Cuit
Big Bang Coffee Roasters
Blessed Brew
Deep Roots Farm NY
Dobbs & Bishop Fine Cheese
DOC Pickle
The Cookery’s DoughNation
FarmEats
Found Herbal
Luxx Chocolat

Madura Farm mushrooms
Mariachi Mexico
MOMO dressing
Pie Lady & Son
Pura Vida Fisheries
Red Jacket Orchards
Sohha Savory Yogurt
Southtown Farms
Sun Sprout Farm
teagevity
Brent The Cheese Guy
True Food
Wave Hill Breads
What’s For Dessert?
Wrights Farm

Herbed Sweet Corn Salad Recipe

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Herbed Sweet Corn Salad

  • 4 ears of shucked corn (Madura Farm)
  • 2 peppers (Madura Farm)
  • 3 tomatoes (Sun Sprout Farm)
  • 1 bunch of parsley (Beery Brook Farm)
  • Few leaves of basil (Deep Roots Farm)
  • Goat cheese (The Cheese Guys)
  • 4 tbsp. of rosemary olive oil (Arlotta)
  • 1-2 tbsp. white balsamic vinaigrette (Arlotta)
  • Berry cedar sea salt (Wild Sea Salt)

 

  1. Cut cob in half and boil for approximately 10 minutes.
  2. While the corn is boiling, chop peppers and tomatoes into dice, taking out juices and seeds. Pat dry with paper towel to remove moisture.
  3. Mince all herbs.
  4. For dressing, mix olive oil, white balsamic vinegar, salt, and pepper.
  5. Once corn is cooked and cool, cut corn off of the cob.
  6. Mix chopped ingredients and dressing together.
  7. Top with goat cheese and enjoy!

 

What to Know about GMO’s:

  • A GMO is an organism that has been modified in the laboratory by using extracted DNA of another species.
  • 88% of corn is genetically modified.
  • GMO’s are made to increase yields, produce mold and rot-resistant fruits and vegetables, ward off insects, and increase quality and reliability of crops.
  • However, the herbicides used on these GM crops are a possible human carcinogen and can interfere with the beneficial bacteria and enzymes in the human body.
  • Farmer’s markets are a great place to buy non-GMO, healthy, delicious corn.

By Jane Wynne